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The Gentle Art of Healing 4

The following was posted on Regain.us. Please contact them or a therapist for help. This is provided for information only.

I think it provides some incite into the colors we are drawn to. Why someone would prefer a certain color yarn over another. I thought it was interesting, I hope you do too.

What Is Color Therapy, What Is It For, And Is It Right For Me?

Updated September 04, 2018

Colors are all around us. They’re in the natural world, in the homes we live in, the cars we drive, the clothes we wear, and the entertainment we watch. Colors aren’t just meaningless parts of our environment, either. They can change the way we feel and react to different situations. Color therapy uses these powers of color to heal, energize, and soothe us.

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What Is Color Therapy?

Color therapy is an alternative therapy that uses colors and their frequencies to heal physical and emotional problems.Color therapy is also known as chromopathy, chromotherapy, or color healing.

What Is Color Therapy Used For?

The goal of color therapy is to correct physiological and psychological imbalances. For instance, if you’re stressed, color therapy can help soothe you so that you can regain your psychological balance. If you’re depressed, color therapy can be used to invigorate you and give you increased energy.

When Did Color Therapy Start?

Color therapy has been around at least since the time of Ancient Egypt. Egyptians believed in the power of light and used different colors of light to promote healing. Color therapy has continued to be important in some cultures. Even in Western societies that tend to prefer modern, institutionalized medicine, natural healers have continued to use colors to help people improve their physical and emotional health.

Although Western medicine doesn’t accept color therapy as such, Western researchers are studying the scientific properties of colored light and the light frequencies within it. Color therapy hasn’t ‘earned’ a place in Western medicine yet, but there’s a strong possibility that it might when all the research results come in.

Colors And Chakras

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Eastern medicine is the source of many of the so-called alternative therapies in the Western world. In Indian philosophy, the chakras are considered the centers of spiritual power and energy within our bodies. There are seven chakras, and a different color represents each:

  1. The Root Chakra, located at the base of the spine, is represented by red. This chakra has to do with our grounding and connection with the Earth.
  2. The Sacral Chakra, located 2 or 3 inches below the navel, is represented by orange. This chakra is said to be associated with reproduction, the kidneys and adrenals, and pleasure. It is the mind-body chakra.
  3. The Solar Plexus Chakra, located between the navel and sternum, is represented by yellow. This chakra is associated with the pancreas, liver, digestive system, and gallbladder, as well as positivity, empowerment, and well-being.
  4. Green represents the Heart Chakra. It’s associated with the heart, lungs, and immune system. It’s associated with energy, the nervous system, mental focus, compassion, and empowerment.
  5. The Throat Chakra is represented by blue and is associated with the thyroid and metabolism as well as peaceful expression.
  6. The Third Eye Chakra, located between the eyebrows is represented by indigo and associated the pituitary gland and pineal gland and influences our sleep cycles, self-esteem, clarity, wisdom, and intuition.
  7. The Crown Chakra, located at the top of the head, is represented by violet and associated with the pineal gland, light sensitivity, sleep cycles, dreams, clarity, and spirituality.

Methods Of Delivery For Color Therapy

The alternative healing practice of color therapy relies on the delivery of the light frequencies of color to the body. The light either goes into the body through the eyes or via color therapy equipment.

Through Eyes

One way to take advantage of light therapy is to view the color simply. You look at the color for a few minutes. That’s all there is to the delivery. What you need to be careful with are the colors you choose. Green is considered the safest color. Red and orange may cause you too much excitement and agitation.

I can’t help this, that’s excitement in @GG’s case. ( Love You, shout out)

Color therapy is individualized as well. What works to help you might make someone else feel worse. For example, if you have a lot of anxiety and need to calm down, blue might be a good color to use. If someone else were depressed, though, blue wouldn’t be a color they should use in color therapy.

Via Color Therapy Equipment

There are various kinds of color therapy equipment. Some of them can be made easily, while others can be ordered for a color therapist’s use. This equipment uses the projection of colored light. Sometimes, the color is projected on a screen, and you look at it. The light comes from specific light bulbs of no more than 500 watts. With color therapy equipment, the colored light can be shone on your skin as well using modern and sometimes high-tech equipment that allows the hue and intensity of the color to be dialed in precisely.

Psychological Effects Of Different Colors

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Colors affect our mental processes and can change our mood. Each color has a different effect, so different colors are used for different mental conditions and mood problems. The following list describes how each of the main colors used in color therapy affects us and what they can do for you.

Green

Green is the most balancing of all the colors. Color therapists usually consider green the safest color and typically start color therapy with it. When you’re feeling sad, hopeless, or depressed, green can improve your mood. However, it’s important to have a pure green color, as a light green can cause you to tip into anxiety.

Green is said to enhance the emotions of love, joy, and inner peace. It can bring you hope, strength, and serenity. Green is said to increase your wisdom and facilitate change and independence.

Blue

Blue is a color that must be used with extra care, as it can zap your energy if you’re feeling low. Blue does help you express your feelings, though, and is related to your inner truth. Blue is a cold color that can be used to help you become more peaceful and relaxed. Primary blue is often used in therapy settings used for meditation and relaxation.

Blue can also be associated with wisdom, creativity, loyalty, and spirituality. Too much blue or blue that is too dark can lead to sadness, depression, and a feeling of emptiness. Light blue promotes serenity. It can also be used to help with insomnia.

Yellow

Yellow can be used in color therapy to bring energy and encourage action. This color can make you feel happier. It can bring out your intelligence and wisdom. Too much or too-bright yellows are associated with betrayal, cruelty, and deceit. It can remind us of our mortality. Yellow is the most intense color in the spectrum.

Orange

Orange signifies abundance, pleasure, well-being, and sexuality. Orange may be used to stimulate different organs in the body for physical healing. It revitalizes you and gives you increased mental energy. It can increase your feeling of connectedness between your mind and body. However, color therapists usually avoid this color for you if you’re prone to anxiety.

Red

Red is even more stimulating than orange. It influences emotional issues like financial independence and physical survival. It’s mostly used for physical healing because its emotional effects can be extreme. Color therapists avoid shining red on your head, as this can cause intense agitation. Infrared can also be used by a skilled color therapist if done so with caution. Neither red nor infrared is used for someone who has severe mental conditions.

Purple

Purple is most strongly associated with beauty, spirituality, and bliss. In color therapy, violet is often used on the forehead and neck to initiate feelings of calm and relaxation. However, it’s recommended for use anywhere on the body.

I was really interested in my color choices and the colors in my stash. I thought maybe the reason some projects end up on time out is because of the colors in it. Either way it’s definitely food for thought.

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The Gentle Art of Healing 2

Interviewer asked: Why Knitting ( crochet, needlework)?

All of these are important.

The brain,has the capacity to process many things at a time, but if the brain is concentrating on doing a cross body task then it has less opportunity or capacity to concentrate on other things like problems or pain for example. There was a study done that showed repetitive movement causes the release of Serotonin in the brain. The rhythmic movement is just as important as the repetitiveness. It takes sort of control over their thought process. And with the movement,and the mood they are in, it is instantaneously soothing and relaxing.

Most of the stories received by the study have mentioned the repetitive movement as facilitating meditative lactate. They say it’s like Meditation, “Zen”.prayer, zoning out, like going to a sanctuary of that peaceful mind.

Rhythmic

  • Repetitive
    • Calming/ Self Soothing
      • Gives a Sense of Control

The Interviewer asked: What else can Knitting(crochet,needlework, ect.) do?

A study was done of people with clinical depression, out of most of our replies, 81% have a happier affinity, 54% happy or very happy, 1% didn’t care.

Then, there are lots of stories of it creating kind of like a barrier, of increased personal space. The way you hold your arms out with your knitting in front of you. It stops the rest of the world from entering your personal space, decreasing anxiety, panic, stress. They can use it as a way to help them socialize, or on public transport.


In fact there are quite a few people who wouldn’t be able to use public transport, without their knitting, because of the way it creates a personal space around them. There are a lot of activities that these people are able to participate in, due to the perceived increase in personal space created by this cross body movement in front of them. They can socialize with other people while having this notion of space, join knitting groups. If they are feeling safe, they can interact with the others. If they are feeling particularly vulnerable they can just sit and knit, just listening to the people around them, giving them the choice of interacting with the others or just sit quietly and knit.


Some describe it as giving their mind a break, especially people with anxiety, continuously worrying about it in their minds. It’s a way of breaking into those thought patterns, again there’s a way of renumerating thinking. A sort of backward loops way of thinking about things, they are very difficult to break once they get established but perhaps it’s the automatic nature of knitting that’s doing that, because automatic movement can effect your subconscious too.

People can forget what it feels like to be relaxed, because if your stressed or anxious for a long period of time, it can affect the muscles, your jaw might be clenched, your posture might be poor, so the brain kind of recognizes this as being you,and you can forget what it feels like to be truly relaxed. So what the professional tries to do, is to get the person to remember how to relax, what it feels like. Its very difficult to get someone to relax if they’ve forgotten what it feels like to be relaxed. So if you give them something like knitting, it can help them to remember what it feels like, get them to recall that feeling, even when they haven’t got their knitting at hand. A daily dose of knitting to help them in terms of managing stress.

This stuff can be a little dry, but I haven’t received any comments telling me to stop. I haven’t received any comments at all. Is anybody out there? Anyway, we will go on to discuss a little more about stress and then on to color theory!

Happy day everyone!

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The Gentle Art of Healing

Hi everyone !!! Sorry for the long break, but it was well spent on research for my new project. As some of you may know:
I am a 60 y.o. Crafter/ Maker & a retired Nurse. I am trying to start a movement involving the Ageing & the Young, Disabled and Mentally and Physically Handicapped. I want to use crochet, knitting, ect. as Art Therapy. This is not something new, it has been in use overseas for years. It has never been widely used in America. Possibly because of our Healthcare systems, Insurance. I don’t think my Insurance will cover my next yarn purchase, or my next set of needles or hooks. It would be great if it did, but we need to stay in reality. This is the first part of a series of articles I am writing. Your comments are greatly encouraged, in fact, if you have an opinion give it good or bad. I read them all, and answer if appropriate.

I am Physically Disabled my Partner in Crime is Mentally Handicapped. We have both found relief from our illness’ through our art. I know many other crafters who have found the same thing. There is a very calming influence that comes over you, it can be very mesmerizing. I call it the”Aahh” moment, I’m sure some of you know that feeling, it happens while your crafting.
The problem is the fact that the ‘Arts’ covers a wide variety of activities from painting, pottery to playing music, concert and museum visits and walks in the park. Some involving physical exertion, others mental and creative stimulation, social contact or a combination of all.

The importance of Therapeutic Knitting or Crocheting

  • Accessible
  • Low cost ( most of the time)
  • Portable

A tool for controlling symptoms such as :

  • Isolation
  • Loneliness
  • Low Self-esteem
  • Decreased Confidence

Feelings of Worthlessness as seen by society or even your own family.

  • Fear
  • Worry
  • Stress
  • Lack of a rewarding Occupation
  • Change of Identity – Sometimes enforced

Common across the board include the Young,the Retired, People with Injuries or Illnesses.

In order to work well, all these issues need to be considered. Social activity groups can offer a lot of support, that’s why knitting & crochet groups are so popular. Groups lead by people who not only have a knowledge of the activity, but also understand how it could help the persons health, can increase the benefits of the activity. Activities need to fit into the ‘real life’ of each participant or they won’t be continued!

Attending a new group for the first time is not that easy, either. Most people will tell you it’s difficult. Social activity groups make it a little easier because at least you have a common interest with others and potential topics of conversation. However, for those who need it the most, it remains a challenging thing to do, so they may opt out unless support and a planned introduction are offered. If you know someone who could benefit from one of these groups, offer to take them, offer to teach them. Many libraries around the country offer classes or a “Stitch and Bitch” Group for free. LYS’ offer classes and groups for a nominal fee.

I have been in touch with the Author and she has given me permission to use this information. This isn’t new stuff, she has been here and discussed this before Medical Professionals as far back as 2007 I think(my numbers could be wrong). If you are interested in learning more she has a website: stitchlinks.com . Imagine what kind of world we would live in if all our government officials were required to take a class or two. I hope those big black trucks aren’t coming!

This is the first of a series of blogs, I would really appreciate you commenting. Let me know if I should continue along this road or not. Thanks

stitchlinks.com Knit for Health and Wellness, Crochet Therapy by Belsan Corkhill
Following on Patreon: Rachel Smith(WoolnSpinning) & Beth Smith ( a wealth of info on spinning, weaving, Sewing)

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To Knit or Crochet..That is the Question

Whether tis nobler. HUH??

I have already told you of my love for spinning. But what do I do with my yarn? I think its a project oriented thing with me. I look for the project then see how to make it. Then learn it.

I have to say if it’s a new to me technique, I challenge myself by picking the hardest project I can find. Then I really learn the technique, because of the challenge. I like to push myself to the limits. Sometimes it’s about the challenge, Other times I have to have the item.

Unfortunately, that leads to a lot of WIPS! If I get bored or frustrated the project goes on time out. This is the first year I have decided to finish some of these WIP’s. I have 3 blankets, 2 pairs of socks, a doll, a shawl, and a partridge in a pear tree!

Honestly though, don’t we all have a pile of WIP’s on time out? Come on now be honest? I would love to hear about your WIP’s ? Why did they go on time out? Why did you start them? Please leave me a comment and let me know, I have always wondered why we do this.

Let me know